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Conferences

SABCS 2019

December 03, 2019

At the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS; December 10-14, 2019), research on the experimental biology, etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of breast cancer and premalignant breast disease was provided to an international audience of academic and private physicians.

Journal of Clinical Pathways provided coverage of the most relevant and important sessions of the meeting.


Liquid Biopsy Shows Promise in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Early results from an ongoing study suggest that serial monitoring of cell-free DNA and circulating tumor cells in patients with triple-negative breast cancer may be useful to help stratify risk and offer biomarkers for new therapies.

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Government-Insured Breast Cancer Patients at Higher Risk of Death

A retrospective study of close to 10,000 women with breast cancer found that Medicare or Medicaid insurance is linked with lower clinical trial participation rates, higher treatment stopping rates, and increased likelihood of death. 

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Real-World Quality of Life for Patients With HR-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

Results of an interim analysis demonstrate that patients treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor for HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer experience stable or improved quality of life after 6 months. 

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Tolerable Safety, Consistent Efficacy for Combination Therapy to Treat HR-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

A CDK-inhibitor plus endocrine therapy is associated with a tolerable safety profile and consistent efficacy for older patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, according to an age-specific subgroup analysis of MONARCH 2 and 3 trials. 

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Cost-Effectiveness of Neoadjuvant, Adjuvant Therapy Combinations for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

A study identified the neoadjuvant plus adjuvant treatment combinations that lead to the highest health benefit at the least cost for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. 

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